Posted by: doras_explorations | December 13, 2008

Pink, Black, and White Cane Experimentation

  I promised in my previous post that I would make a pink, black, and white cane, and photograph the steps I used in its construction. This color combination was inspired by a pair of Comanche seed bead earrings I made recently.  As usual, I didn’t have a particular ‘plan’ other than to try to keep the design principles of value and contrast  in mind.  Here are some of the canes I made: pbwa2pbwb

      I wasn’t too excited about most of them, to tell the truth.  I thought the round kaleidoscope ‘starburst’ one with the zig-zags at the edges (bottom photo on the right) was the best of the bunch, although it could’ve used more contrast (more black and white, less pink).  Unfortunately, I could not recall how I made it, except that I combined a chevron cane with a Skinner Blend roll !  Eventually I  will figure it out (I hope!), and when I do, I’ll post the steps, although I might try it with a different color trio.

     So, instead I decided to make  the cane to the left of the round one.  I don’t know what to call it, it looks sort of  like a basketweave design, but it’s not really the same pattern as what is usually referred to as a ‘basketweave cane’, such as this one by Jana Roberts Benzon.

     Here are the steps, beginning as usual with my Skinner Blend colors. Sorry for the small captions under the photos, but repeated attempts to fix them were unsuccessful !


pbw1

pbw2

Blend after 20 pasta machine passes.  The ragged edges were trimmed before proceeding further

Blend after 20 pasta machine passes. The ragged edges were trimmed before proceeding further

 

This is the blend after 30 passes.  I folded it again, then turned it 90°, with the dark pink down and ran it through the pasta machine at medium thin setting to lengthen the blend.

This is the blend after 30 passes. I folded it again, then turned it 90°, with the dark pink side facing down and ran it through the pasta machine at medium thin setting to lengthen the blend.

 

Here's the lengthened blend.  I rolled up this sheet starting at the white end.

Here's the lengthened blend. I rolled up this sheet starting at the white end.

After making the jellyroll blend (pictured at far right) I wrapped it with a very thin sheet of dark pink (#7 Atlas thickness), followed by a #7 thickness of white, and finally a #7 thickness of black

After making the jellyroll blend I wrapped it with a very thin sheet of dark pink (#7 Atlas thickness), followed by a #7 thickness of white, and finally a #7 thickness of black. I took slices from the jellyroll so you could see the progression. The actual jellyroll cane was about 3/4" in diameter and 6-7" in length.

 

The jellyroll was flattened and cut into 4 pieces, then stacked like this.

The jellyroll was flattened and cut into 4 pieces, then stacked like this.

 

This stack was then reduced to form a cane approximately 6-7” long and ¾” square.

This stack was then reduced to form a cane approximately 6-7” long and ¾” square.

 

The cane was then cut in half.  Each half was cut corner to corner to make 2 right triangles, for a total of 4 pieces.

The cane was then cut in half. Each half was cut corner to corner to make 2 right triangles, for a total of 4 pieces.

 

Each of the triangle 4 pieces was placed on the work surface, with the wide part of the triangle on the bottom, and the point of the triangle at the top.  The cutting blade was lined up along the point of each triangle, then the triangle was cut to the bottom.  This resulted in 8 small right triangle pieces.

Each of the triangle 4 pieces was placed on the work surface, with the wide part of the triangle on the bottom, and the point of the triangle at the top. The cutting blade was lined up along the point of each triangle, then the triangle was cut to the bottom. This resulted in 8 small right triangle pieces.

 

The 8 triangles were arranged like this before putting them together.

The 8 triangles were arranged like this before putting them together.

 

Here are the pieces put together to form the ‘base cane’

Here are the pieces put together to form the ‘base cane’

 

The base cane was then reduced to a length of approximately 6-7”, then cut into 4 pieces

The base cane was then reduced to a length of approximately 6-7”, then cut into 4 pieces

 

Here are the 4 pieces put together to form a ‘base cane x4’ variation.

Here are the 4 pieces put together to form a ‘base cane x4’ variation.

 

Here the cane was further reduced to make more variations.  Note the different orientation of the squares in the cane on the far left.  I made this by taking a piece of the ‘base cane x4’, cutting it on a diagonal, then putting the 2 pieces ‘back to back’ to form a triangle, cutting the triangle in half, and putting it the pieces back together and reducing.  It goes on and on and on, doesn’t it?

Here the cane was further reduced to make more variations. Note the different orientation of the squares in the cane on the far left. I made this by taking a piece of the ‘base cane x4’, cutting it on a diagonal, then putting the 2 pieces ‘back to back’ to form a triangle, cutting the triangle in half, and putting it the pieces back together and reducing. It goes on and on and on, doesn’t it?

I decided to stop here before I reduced too much !!!!

I decided to stop here before I reduced too much !!!!

         Maybe I’ll make beads with these canes, or cover a box….but most likely they will sit in a  #5 plastic container with my other canes for a long time to come !  

 

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Responses

  1. Very cool, Dora! I’m so glad to see you’re posting your ideas again and can’t wait for more!

  2. What an awesome cane tute, Dora! I love the pink, black and white color palette. As I was looking at your photos, I find that I like the look of a cane before it’s reduced, like the “base” cane and “4 variation”. I like more of an organic look.
    Hey, do you think it’s possible to make a “batik” cane? I know that you love batik. I do, too. That would make beautiful polyclay “fabric”!
    Please share photos of what you make with this cane. 🙂

  3. Thank you so much Dora!! You make beautiful canes… and seeing your process, well, it just clicks, and you say, “oh, yeah, I get it now!”
    and Artandtea, could you use a stamp and do a Mokume Gane? Would that give you the batik look?

    Thanks again Dora, can’t wait to see more…. :0)

  4. Thanks, Tina !
    That’s a good idea about using MG to give a batik look…Using a lot of white would give the appearance of ‘resist lines’ I know in one of my books, there is a project for making batik canes, I’ll have to look for it…I would think that outlining cane designs with white would give the effect..

  5. I like this cane Dora. Especially the largest one!

    It is funny, I always like the bolder designs, but often when I make canes I keep reducing them and adding them together until they get very tiny.

    It is like I am possessed! … must reduce cane…. must reduce cane… must reduce cane!! 😉

  6. I do the same thing, Cindy ! Reduce and reduce and reduce…
    It must be why I end up with so much scrap !

  7. Beautiful cane work! Thanks for the step by step…I love seeing the process!

  8. hello, I’m french and I see your blog for the first time, I thanks you for all you give in polymer art ,
    I make polymer since 2 years , and I enjoy all your work (I hope you understand my english)
    I will return here
    bye

  9. thank you, maerys, I’m glad you like my blog !

  10. Beautiful! I don’t have the patience to make beautiful polymer clay beads. I am going to start following your blog. You have a new reader. Brenda

  11. Thanks, Brenda ! Actually, I don’t have the patience to make polymer beads either, I usually stop after I make the canes, LOL !! However, one of my New Year’s resolutions is to make more finished work (beads, jewelry, whatever) with my canes..
    I’ve tumble sanded some beads, now I have to buff them and design a necklace. The pressure is on !

  12. tu si que eres ”buena profesora” te almiro mucho enseñas lo que sabes que el señor te ilumine por siemple besos tu amiga angelica….

    • Thanks Victoria, I am pleased that you like my work. I do not speak Spanish, but I recognize a few words. Sometimes I use http://babelfish.yahoo.com/translate_txt for translation, but it is not very good…
      Muchas gracias Victoria, estoy contento que usted tiene gusto de mi trabajo. No hablo español, sino que reconozco algunas palabras. Utilizo a veces http://babelfish.yahoo.com/translate_txt para la traducción, pero no es muy bueno…

  13. Stunning, I didn’t know about that till now. Thankz!

    • Thanks ! Great blog, by the way, the photography is fantastic !

  14. thanks for the tute i still need a lot of practice on these things

  15. I am so glad i found your site!! wonderful instructions! thank you for taking the time to fully explain everything!

    • Thanks, Erin ! I’m glad you found the instructions helpful !

  16. great job!!!!thank you so much.. it helped me a lot…wish you more inspiration for 2015


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